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Cornell University

CIRTL at Cornell

Past Online Courses

Explore topics and descriptions of past online courses offered through the CIRTL Network:


Fall 2018

Practicum in Developing Assessments (Short Course)

Develop two commonly used STEM assessments – multiple choice questions and classroom activities – and strengthen them through peer-review feedback in this 3-week online course.

  • October 2 – December 6, 2018
  • Meets online biweekly on Tuesdays from 1-3 pm ET
  • Early registration: August 20 – September 3. Regular registration: September 4-24.
  • Credit: N/A

Equity in STEM for All Genders

Analyze gender bias and collaboratively develop approaches to counter gender bias in STEM in this 9-week online course.

  • October 4 – December 6, 2018
  • Meets online weekly on Thursdays from 2-4 pm ET
  • Early registration: August 20 – September 3. Regular registration: September 4-24.
  • Credit: 1 credit optional

Planning your Teaching as Research Project

Plan and refine your own Teaching-as-Research project alongside a learning community of peers in this 10-week online course.

  • October 4 – December 13, 2018
  • Meets online weekly on Thursdays from 12-1:30 pm ET
  • Early registration: August 20 – September 3. Regular registration: September 4-24.
  • Credit: 1 credit optional

An Introduction to Evidence-Based Undergraduate STEM Teaching (Massive Open Online Course, or MOOC)

Learn about STEM teaching at your own pace through online video modules and discussion boards in this 8-week MOOC developed by CIRTL Network faculty.

  • October 1 – November 25, 2018
  • Early registration: Registration dates to be announced.
  • Credit: N/A

Summer 2018

Designing Your Course & Designing Yourself as a Teacher: A Simultaneous Process

Learn to think holistically about your course design and teaching philosophy in this 4-week online short course.

  • July 5 – July 26, 2018
  • Meets online weekly on Thursdays from 2-4 pm ET
  • Early registration: May 7 – June 4. Regular registration: June 5-25.
  • Credit: N/A

Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on Evidence-Based Undergraduate STEM Teaching

Learn about developing effective, evidence-based STEM teaching practices at your own pace through online video modules and discussion boards in this MOOC developed by CIRTL Network faculty. Both current and aspiring faculty are welcome in this course.

  • Starts June 11, 2018
  • Self-paced online course materials, weekly local discussions at Cornell TBD based on participant schedules.
  • Credit: N/A

Spring 2018

The College Classroom

Explore how people learn, discuss how to monitor and investigate the effectiveness of the learning environment, learn what it means to create an inclusive classroom environment that engages all learners, and utilize backward design to develop a microteaching project.

  • January 31 – April 11, 2018
  • Meets weekly on Wednesdays, 11:30 am-1:00 pm ET
  • Instructors: Julie Briski and April Dukes, University of Pittsburgh
  • 1 credit optional

Diversity in the College Classroom

Understand the theory behind how diversity affects learning and develop practical classroom strategies.

  • January 29 – March 19, 2018
  • Meets weekly on Mondays from 3:00-4:30 pm ET
  • Instructors: Gabriela Zapata, Texas A&M University, and Rachel Kennison, University of California Los Angeles
  • 1 credit optional

Research Mentor Training

Develop a personal mentoring philosophy, learn how to articulate that philosophy across a variety of disciplines, and refine strategies for dealing with mentoring challenges.

  • January 30 – April 10, 2018
  • Meets weekly on Tuesdays, 2:30 am – 3:45 pm ET
  • Instructor: Jeffrey Franke, University of Maryland, College Park
  • 1 credit optional

CIRTL Reads: A Journal Club on STEM Teaching (Short Course)

Read and discuss recent articles on STEM pedagogy and current trends in STEM education, in an online journal club meeting through web conferencing.

  • January 29 – April 20, 2018
  • Meets on certain Tuesdays, between the hours of 11:30 am – 1:30 pm ET
  • Instructor: Adam Blanford, University of Colorado at Boulder

Engaging Students in the Teaching of Statistics (Short Course)

Learn about backwards design, develop an understanding of diversity that maximizes everyone’s learning, and explore approaches to engage students actively in their own learning.

  • March 14 – April 11, 2018
  • Meets weekly on Wednesdays, 2:00 – 4:00 pm ET
  • Instructors: Rick Nordheim, Frederick Boehm, and Don Gillian-Daniel, University of Wisconsin
  • Credit: N/A

Spring 2017

Basics of Online Learning and Teaching

This course is designed to help graduate students and postdocs new to teaching online learn how to design and run an effective course.

  • Thursdays, February 2, March 16, and March 30-April 20, 1:30-3:00 pm ET
  • Instructors: Colleen McLinn, Cornell University, and Nancy Abney, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • 1 credit optional

The College Classroom

Learn the basics of effective teaching, explore your teaching philosophy, design a course curriculum, and learn how to investigate the effectiveness of the learning environment what it means to create an inclusive classroom.

  • Tuesdays, January 31-April 18, 11:00-12:20 pm ET
  • Instructors: Julie Breckenridge-Briski, University of Pittsburgh
  • 1 credit optional

Developing a Teaching Portfolio

Learn how to craft a teaching philosophy statement, document teaching experience, and effectively present evidence of teaching effectiveness in a professional teaching portfolio.

  • Tuesdays, January 31 and March 21, 3:00-5:00 pm ET
  • Instructors: Meredith Henry and Nancy Abney, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • 1 credit optional

Diversity in the College Classroom

Become a better college instructor by considering the complex issues of diversity and how to address them effectively in your classroom practice.

  • Wednesdays, February 1-March 29, 12:00-1:30 pm ET
  • Instructors: Jenny Frederick, Yale University, and Kate Williams, Georgia Tech
  • 1 credit optional

Research Mentor Training

Work with a community of peers to develop and improve your mentoring skills. Articulate a personal mentoring philosophy and explore multiple strategies for dealing with mentoring challenges.

  • Thursdays, February 2-April 20, 3:00-4:15 pm ET
  • Instructors: Jeffrey Franke and Blessing Enekwe, University of Maryland College Park
  • 1 credit optional

Service Learning in STEM Classrooms: Introduction to Pedagogy and Practice

Service learning is a high-impact pedagogy that engages students in applying what they are learning about in their class to a real-world community issue, and includes reflective activities. Explore best practices, resources, and examples of this pedagogy.

  • Tuesdays, February 7-March 28, 2:00-4:00 pm ET
  • Instructor: Paul Matthews, University of Georgia
  • Not for credit

Teaching as Research

Learn basic concepts, techniques, and procedures of conducting a Teaching as Research (TAR) project in the undergraduate classroom. Develop a Teaching as Research proposal that you can carry out in a future semester.

  • Mondays, January 30-April 3, 11:00-12:30 pm ET
  • Instructor: Denise Pope, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • 1 credit optional

Summer 2017

Developing a CV or Resume

  • Thursday, June 22 and Thursday, June 29, 2017 from 11:00am – 12:30pm ET
  • Offered by University of Texas at Arlington
  • Meets online
  • Registration from May 29-June 14, 2017

Level Up: Designing a Game-Based Learning Environment

  • Tuesday, June 27, 2017 from 1:00-3:00pm ET
  • Offered by Texas A&M University
  • Meets online
  • Registration from June 5-19, 2017

Fall 2017

Creating Assessments for the STEM Classroom

Learn how to create and implement assessments particular to STEM courses.

  • October 3 – November 28, 2017
  • Meets weekly on Tuesdays, 11:30 am – 1:00 pm ET (no meeting on October 10 or November 21)
  • Instructors: April Dukes and Julie Briski, University of Pittsburgh
  • Credit: N/A

The College Classroom: Teaching Inclusively

Study issues of inclusion and develop an inclusive micro-teaching plan in this hands-on course.

  • October 3 – November 28, 2017
  • Meets weekly on Tuesdays, 2:00-4:00 pm ET
  • Instructors: Don Gillian-Daniel, Rick Nordheim, Brett Nachman, and Frederick Boehm, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • 1 credit optional

Diversity in the College Classroom

Understand the theory behind how diversity affects learning and develop practical classroom strategies.

  • October 4 – December 6, 2017
  • Meets weekly on Wednesdays from 12:00-1:30 pm ET (no meeting on November 22)
  • Instructors: Jenny Frederick, Yale University, Kate Williams, University of Georgia
  • 1 credit optional

Equity in STEM for All Genders

Analyze gender bias and collaboratively develop approaches to counter gender bias in STEM.

  • October 5 – December 7, 2017
  • Meets weekly on Thursdays, 11:30-1:30 ET (no meeting on November 23)
  • Instructors: Lisa Berry, University of Texas at Arlington, Don Gillian-Daniel, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Kaury Kucera, Yale University
  • 1 credit optional

Teaching as Research

Learn basic concepts, techniques, and procedures of conducting a Teaching as Research (TAR) project in the undergraduate classroom, with an emphasis on STEM or social science disciplines. Develop a Teaching as Research project proposal that you can carry out in 2018.

  • October 2 – December 4, 2017
  • Meets weekly on Mondays, 2:00-3:30 pm ET
  • Instructors: Denise Pope, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Adrienne Williams, University of California Irvine
  • 1 credit optional

Teaching with Technology

Enhance your understanding of educational technologies by exploring options for students to communicate and collaborate, for you to assess learning, and potentially flip aspects of the class.

  • October 2 – December 4, 2017
  • Meets weekly on Mondays, 11:30 am – 1:00 pm ET
  • Instructor: Rob Linsenmeier, Northwestern University
  • 1 credit optional

Massive Open Online Course: An Introduction to Evidence-Based Undergraduate STEM Teaching

Learn about STEM teaching at your own pace through online video modules and discussion boards in this MOOC developed by CIRTL Network faculty.

  • October 2 – November 26, 2017
  • Self-paced online course materials, weekly local discussions at Cornell TBD based on participant schedules.
  • Instructors: TBA
  • Credit: N/A

Summer 2016

Basics of Online Learning and Teaching

This course is designed to help graduate students and postdocs new to teaching online learn how to design and run an effective course. After an initial synchronous session, there will be 6 weekly, asynchronous modules about effective online pedagogy, each involving approximately 6 hours of readings and assignments. This will be followed by several weeks of project work time, which will lead to the development of materials for an online course you plan to teach in the future. A subsequent synchronous component will explore teaching with Blackboard Collaborate web conferencing software, and will provide an opportunity for further peer review of your course materials.

  • Dates: Meets June 6, July 18, August 1-3, Mondays, 4:00-5:30 pm ET and as announced in August
  • Instructors: Judy Milton, University of Georgia and Peggy Semingson, University of Texas at Arlington
  • Credit: n/a

Disabling Difference in the STEM Classroom

As our classrooms become more diverse, and as we witness an increase in the number of students with disabilities (the National Council on Disability estimates that 11% of undergraduates in the US have a disability), so we need to formulate responses that respond to this reality. This course will introduce future faculty to developing inclusive courses and classrooms using the guiding principles of Universal Design. This will involve an in-depth look at engaging learners of all abilities, representing information in multiple ways, and creating opportunities that allow students to express what they have learned in ways that are meaningful to both them and us. 

  • Dates: June 15-July 20, 2016
  • Times: Wednesdays, 2:15-3:30PM ET
  • Instructors: Indrani Singh, Jennifer Hadingham, and Amy Clark, University of Rochester
  • Credit: n/a

 

Integrating Creativity, Innovation, and Design Thinking in STEM Courses

The Maker Movement has seen a large increase in the need to infuse innovation and entrepreneurship into STEM courses. Helping students develop “innovation literacy” is becoming a new aspect of STEM education. Incorporating creativity techniques, games, as well as innovation techniques can greatly improve students’ interest in the subject matter, improve problem solving abilities, but also helps see how the STEM work relates to real world applications. This short course is intended to help participants understand  aspects of creativity, innovation, and design thinking, and how best to incorporate these into teaching courses.

  • Dates: July 6-27, 2016, Wednesdays, 1:00-2:30 pm ET
  • Instructors: Mary Besterfield-Sacre and Julie Breckenridge, University of Pittsburgh
  • Credit: n/a

Fall 2016

Teaching with Technology

This course is designed to help STEM graduate students and postdocs at the start of their teaching careers enhance their understanding of educational technologies. Instructors in all courses have a large number of options for communicating with students: having students work together, connecting coursework to the world outside the classroom, offloading some aspects of the course in favor of emphasizing others during synchronous meetings, doing formative and summative assessment, and enhancing the ability for students to do gain more practice, do independent work, or obtain deeper mastery of a subject. Most of these are under the control of the instructor, and it is technologies in this spectrum that we will focus on in this course. Our discussion of such systems will be from the perspective of understanding how to use their features to enhance community, engagement, and learning.

September 27, 2016 – November 29, 2016
Instructors: Robert A. Linsenmeier, Northwestern University, Sabrina Kramer, and Stephen M. Roth, University of Maryland

Diversity in the College Classroom: Teaching the STEM Undergraduate

Become a better college instructor by considering the complex issues of diversity and how to address them effectively in your classroom practice. Current graduate students and faculty are recognizing that we must consider that the way we teach differentially impacts the success of all our students. This course is designed for graduate students and post-docs who have an interest in advancing diversity issues as educators. Participants in this course will take a critical yet practical look at how we define diversity and for what purposes, and discuss the ways different definitions of diversity might influence what and how we teach our disciplinary topics. Participants will also create a diversity-focused plan of action for their future teaching practice. 

September 29, 2016 – December 1, 2016
Instructors: Jean Alley, Vanderbilt University and Robin Paige, Rice University

Creating Assessments and Evaluation Plans

Creating an assessment tool that measures your intended student learning outcomes is critical. You don’t know if you have achieved the learning outcome unless you’ve properly measured it! This course is intended to help participants learn and develop skills associated with creating and implementing assessments particular to STEM courses. Each week, students will pre-read information related to assessment. Each live, synchronous session will review aspects of the technique (i.e., development issues, implementation and administration, when best to apply, etc.), as well as provide examples. The last session will be devoted to learning how to develop an evaluation plan for an education-related project.

October 4, 2016 – November 15, 2016
Instructors: Mary Besterfield-Sacre and Julie Breckenridge, University of Pittsburgh

 


Spring 2015

This course is designed to help graduate students and postdocs new to teaching online learn how to design and run an effective course. After an initial synchronous session, there will be 6 weekly, asynchronous modules about effective online pedagogy, each involving approximately 6 hours of readings and assignments. This will be followed by several weeks of project work time, which will lead to the development of materials for an online course you plan to teach in the future. A subsequent synchronous component will explore teaching with Blackboard Collaborate web conferencing software, and will provide an opportunity for further peer review of your course materials.

Basics of Online Learning and Teaching

  • Dates: January 28, 2015 – April 22, 2015
  • Times: Wednesdays 11:00 – 12:30 ET
  • Instructors: Dr. Don Gillian-Daniel, University of Wisconsin-Madison and Dr. Colleen McLinn, Cornell University
  • Competencies: STEM Teaching; Teaching with Technology; Assessment
  • Format: Weekly synchronous online sessions supplemented with asynchronous coursework
  • Credit: 2 credits optional

The College Classroom

Participants will learn the basics of effective teaching as well as ideas at the forefront of college education. Students will explore their teaching philosophy, design a course curriculum, learn how to monitor and investigate the effectiveness of the learning environment, and explore what it means to create an inclusive classroom environment that engages all learners. An emphasis on a learning-centered classroom will provide participants with a perspective that highlights the interconnected cycle of teaching, assessment, and learning such that they become reflective practitioners, viewing their classroom as sites for ongoing research into their own teaching. 

  • Dates: January 29 – April 2, 2015, Thursdays 1:00 – 2:30 ET
  • Instructors: Dr. Peter Newbury, University of California, San Diego
  • Credit: 1 credit optional

Effective Teaching with Technology

Instructors have many choices of technologies (e.g. clickers, online homework platforms, learning management systems, simulations and modeling, asynchronous delivery) to enhance traditional methods of presentation, assessment, and communication in STEM courses, but there can also be challenges in adopting new technologies. The primary objective of this course is to understand how each of several technologies supports some aspect of learning. For each technology, the focus will be on a critical, literature-based assessment of pros and cons and applicability, rather than mechanics of implementation. Assignments will include reflecting on assigned readings, participating in weekly discussions, and one investigation and presentation of a learning technology. 

  • Dates: February 2 – March 23, 2015, Mondays 3:00 – 4:30 ET
  • Instructors: Dr. Robert A. Linsenmeier, Northwestern University; Dr. Stephen M. Roth, University of Maryland, College Park; Dr. Sabrina Kramer, University of Maryland, College Park
  • Credit: 1 credit optional

Research Mentor Training

Seminar participants will work with a community of peers to develop and improve their mentoring skills. By the end of this class, participants should be able to clearly articulate a mentoring philosophy to those inside and outside of their discipline and have developed strategies for dealing with mentoring challenges. In this course, participants will explore both sides of the mentor/mentee relationship and developing transferable skills, competencies, and self-efficacy whether they are mentors for early graduate students or undergraduates in their labs or mentees working with their faculty advisors. 

  • Dates: February 5 – April 9, 2015, Thursdays 2:00 – 3:00 ET
  • Instructors: Dr. Bennett Goldberg, Boston University, and Dr. Claudia Vergara, Michigan State University
  • Credit: 1 credit optional

The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning II

This course focuses on the implementation and analysis of a classroom-based Teaching as Research project, with emphasis on practices suitable for technology, engineering, and related disciplines. Students will consult with course instructors as they collect and analyze data and complete their projects, and then publicly share their results. Prior participation in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning I or permission of the instructor is required. Participants should have a complete draft study proposal and Institutional Review Board approval/exemption prior to the start of the course. 

  • Dates: January 26, 2015 – May 4, 2015, Mondays, 3:10-4:00 ET
  • Instructor: Dr. Steven A. Freeman, Iowa State University
  • Credit: 2 credits optional

Online Homework: A Practical Guide (Short Course)

Since the use of these systems is so common, especially in large enrollment courses, having a background in learning technologies is an asset in the job market and will aid in transition to a faculty role. It is often young faculty members who bring best practices with new technologies to their departments. Topics will include: Instructor tools for online homework (with focus on WeBWorK), getting students into the system, creating a problem set, using the scoring tools, etc.

  • Dates:  February 2, 2015 – March 2, 2015
  • Times: Mondays 12:00 – 1:00 ET
  • Instructor: Dr. Vicki Roth, University of Rochester, and Dr. Wendi Heinzelman, University of Rochester
  • Credit: None available

Summer 2015

Basics of Online Learning and Teaching

This course is designed to help faculty and staff new to teaching online learn how to design and run an effective course. After an initial synchronous session, there will be 6 weekly, asynchronous modules about effective online pedagogy, each involving approximately 6 hours of readings and assignments. This will be followed by several weeks of project work time, which will lead to the development of materials for an online course you plan to teach in the future. A subsequent synchronous component will explore teaching with Blackboard Collaborate web conferencing software, and will provide an opportunity for further peer review of your course materials.

  • Dates: June 7, 2015 – August 2, 2015
  • Instructors: Dr. Jeff Engler, University of Alabama at Birmingham and Dr. Judy Milton, University of Georgia
  • Credit: 2 credits optional

 

Online Assignments in STEM Courses: A Practical Guide (Short Course)

Since the use of these systems is so common, especially in large enrollment courses, having a background in learning technologies is an asset in the job market and will aid in transition to a faculty role. It is often young faculty members who bring best practices with new technologies to their departments. Topics will include: Instructor tools for online homework (with focus on WeBWorK), getting students into the system, creating a problem set, using the scoring tools, etc. 

  • Dates:  May 19, 2015 – June 30, 2015, Tuesdays 12:00 – 1:15 ET
  • Instructor: Dr. Vicki Roth, University of Rochester, and Dr. Patrick Papadopulos, University of Rochester
  • Credit: None available

Spring 2014

Teaching Science and Engineering Through Debating Civic Issues

Cultivate scientifically literate students able to intelligently debate hot issues like biotechnology and climate change. Explore structured discussions, mock trials, and other teaching technique. 

Instructors: Jean Goodwin and Michael Dahlstrom, Iowa State University
1-2 evening sessions TBA

Preparing Future STEM Faculty to Meet the Needs of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations

Identify the needs of individuals with culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, and implement strategies to improve the learning outcomes of all students.

Instructors: Mabel Rivera, University of Houston
Alternate Thursdays, 5:00-8:00 pm ET

Exploring New Technologies for Active Learning: Maximizing Student Engagement

Practice with technology strategies that have become part of standard operating procedure for many STEM classrooms (including flipped classrooms and embedded audio/video).

Instructors: Mary Besterfield-Sacre, Janet Littrell, University of Pittsburgh
Tuesdays, 1:30-2:30 pm ET

Understanding and Implementing Scholarly Teaching Practices

Explore literature on evidence-based teaching and develop meaningful education research questions. Implement a mini-project to study these questions in your own setting, and share findings with peers.

Instructors: Ann Cavallo, University of Texas at Arlington, and Colleen McLinn, Cornell University
Alternate Wednesdays, 3:00-4:30 pm ET

Research Mentor Training

Improve your mentoring effectiveness and research productivity while reducing frustration and providing mentees with a better experience. Discuss case studies and time management and develop a mentoring philosophy.

Instructors: Chris Pfund, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Melissa McDaniels, Michigan State University
Wednesdays, 1:00-2:30 pm ET

Teacher Training Learning Modules

Expand your academic flexibility by acquiring in-depth teacher training on specific topics such as learning communities, discourse and questioning. Best suited for early graduate students.

Instructors: Bennett Goldberg and Kathryn Spilios, Boston University
Alternate Wednesdays, 11:00 am-noon ET

Implementing Service-Learning in STEM Disciplines

Explore best practices and steps to consider in developing a course using service-learning, strategies for working with community partners, and research on using service-learning in teaching. 

Instructors: Paul Matthews and Shannon Wilder, University of Georgia
Tuesdays, 1:00-3:00 pm ET (from 2/18-3/25)

 


Summer 2014

Peer Instruction Using Clickers (Short Course)

Effective peer instruction requires identifying conceptually-challenging concepts, writing questions which will engage the students and facilitating the activity to resolution. In this course, we’ll start with the research about how people learn and how peer instruction uses those key findings, and then develop the skills to know what to ask, how to ask it, and how to resolve it. By the end of the course, you’ll be able to: write questions that give your students practice thinking more like experts in your discipline, skillfully guide your students through episodes of peer instruction in class, and integrate peer instruction into your course’s lessons and assessment scheme.

Dates: July 2 – July 30, Wednesdays, 2:00-3:30 pm ET (7/2, 7/9, 7/16, 7/23, 7/30)
Instructors: Dr. Peter Newbury and Dr. Beth Simon, University of California, San Diego
Time Commitment: 3-5 hours per week

Online Course: Planning Your Career – Developing Your Academic E-Portfolio

Are you interested in a career in academia? Would you like to develop an electronic portfolio that best reflects your teaching, research, and service experience and can be easily accessed by multiple employers? This course will assist students in the design and creation of an academic electronic portfolio (e-portfolio), including sections such as teaching philosophy, research statement, service, and curriculum vita (CV). Artifacts of supporting evidence, audiences, contexts, and self-evaluation of practice will also be discussed. Through reflection, discussion, and peer collaboration, students will assemble and/or create a collection of work representing their academic accomplishments and career goals.

Dates: May 29 – July 31, Thursdays at 4:30-5:30 pm ET
Instructors: Dr. Ra’sheedah Richardson and Cindy Raisor, Texas A&M University
Time Commitment: 3-5 hours per week

Online Course: Basics of Online Learning and Teaching

This online course is designed to teach faculty and staff from CIRTL Network institutions how to create and teach an online course for the Network. The asynchronous component covers the basics of effective online pedagogy. A synchronous component explores teaching in Blackboard Collaborate and provides an opportunity for peer review of newly developed course materials. Graduate students and postdocs are also eligible to register, although they will get the most out of this course if they are in the process of designing their own course project.

Dates: June 5 – August 15, Meets Thursday, June 5th from 11-12:30 pm ET online, asynchronous work from June 9-July 19, independent project work from July 20-August 3, plus 2-4 Blackboard Collaborate sessions between August 4-15
Instructors: Dr. Don Gillian-Daniel, University of Wisconsin-Madison and Dr. Jeff Engler, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Competencies: STEM Teaching, Teaching as Research, Learning Communities, Learning through Diversity
Format: Mostly asynchronous work in Moodle with 3-5 synchronous meetings using Blackboard Collaborate
Time Commitment: 6-8 hours per week


Fall 2014 

CIRTL MOOC: An Introduction to Evidence-Based Undergraduate STEM Teaching

Participate in a Massive, Open Online Course (MOOC) designed to prepare STEM future and current faculty to be more effective teachers. Hosted by Coursera, this six-week MOOC will be highly interactive, with thousands of participants moving together through the materials at their own pace, conversing on discussion boards, providing feedback, sharing perspectives, and peer-reviewing assignments. What teaching methods work best for you and your students? How do you design lessons and assignments to create high-impact learning experiences for your students? Cornell University will be hosting local MOOC clubs on the Ithaca campus to discuss the course materials – contact cu-cirtl@cornell.edu if you are interested in participating in or leading a club. Follow @CIRTLMOOC and #STEMTeaching on Twitter for real-time updates.

  • Dates: October 6 – November 23, 2014
  • Instructors: Faculty and staff from across the CIRTL Network
  • Format: Self-paced MOOC course materials through Coursera supplemented with in-person discussions
  • Credit: None available

 

Journal Club: CIRTL Reads

CIRTL Reads is a cross-Network scholarly discussion of recent peer-reviewed STEM education literature. During the 2014-2015 academic year, participants will read and critique a selection of Teaching as Research studies and other research examining a variety of pedagogy topics, including diversity and learning communities in STEM. You may register for both fall and spring semesters if you wish to receive a letter of completion, or simply drop in for discussions of the papers you choose to read without registering.

  • Dates: September 10 – December 3, 2014 (then resuming in February 2015), Second Wednesday of the month, 3:00-4:00 pm ET (December’s meeting will be on the first Wednesday)
  • Instructors: Dr. Lorine Giangola, STEM Coordinator of Graduate Teacher Program, University of Colorado at Boulder
  • Credit: None available

Teaching as Research: Scholarship of Teaching and Learning I

Participants will gain familiarity with basic concepts, techniques, and procedures of conducting Teaching as Research (TAR), also known as the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL), in the undergraduate classroom. The course is appropriate for scholars in all STEM fields, although emphasis will be given to practices suitable for technology, engineering, and related disciplines. Participants will complete a classroom research proposal in this course, which may be implemented as part of a second course in Spring 2015. (Students may develop projects in teams of 1-4 people and are encouraged to form teams before registration.)

  • Dates: September 9 – December 16, 2014, Mondays, 3:10-4:00 pm ET
  • Instructors: Dr. Steven A. Freeman, Professor of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, Iowa State University and Dr. Laura Slane, Postdoctoral Researcher in Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Credit: 1 credit optional

Diversity in the College Classroom

The way we teach differentially impacts the success of all our students. Become a better college instructor by considering the complex issues of diversity and how to address them effectively in your classroom practice. Participants in this course will take a critical yet practical look at how we define diversity and for what purposes, and discuss how different definitions of diversity might influence teaching of disciplinary topics. Participants will also create a diversity-focused plan of action for their future teaching practice.

  • Dates: September 8 – December 8, 2014, Mondays, 2:00-3:30 pm ET
  • Instructors: Dr. Denise Leonard, HHMI Postdoctoral Fellow in Science Education, Washington University in St. Louis, and Jean Alley, Program Coordinator in Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University
  • Credit: 1 credit optional

The Active Classroom – Successfully Implementing Small-Group Learning in STEM Courses (Short Course)

This is a short course on using near-peer, collaborative learning and how to begin implementing this paradigm into one’s STEM course (usually large, lecture-based). It’s a quick-start to both the knowledge behind and the practicality of implementing small-group problem-solving Workshops (with examples from the model at the University of Rochester, where Workshops started in Organic Chemistry). Doing so isn’t trivial, but with reasonable expectations and the knowledge of what to anticipate, our students will see that implementing small-group learning into their future courses is manageable.

  • Dates: October 6 – November 14, 2014, Mondays, 12:00-1:00 pm ET
  • Instructors: Dr. Nicholas Hammond, Lecturer and Assistant Director for Workshops and Dr. Robin Frye, Assistant Director for Study Skills and Workshops, both of the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning, University of Rochester
  • Credit: None available

 

Student-Centered Course Design (Short Course)

Designing a college course involves many decision-making processes and steps. Instructors need to take into consideration the subject matter, instructional approaches, assessment and other factors surrounding the teaching and learning environment. The goal of this short course is to provide participants with models, strategies and tools to aid in creating a student-centered learning environment. It will include mini-lectures, readings, discussions, and individual and group activities in which participants will critique learning activities, assessments, and also develop and present their own instructional strategies and assignments to the class.

  • Dates: September 10 – October 15, 2014, Wednesdays, 12:00-1:00 pm ET
  • Instructor: Dr. Mei-Yau Shih, Associate Director of the Center for Teaching & Faculty Development, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
  • Credit: None available